This GLESEC Warning Follows a Social Media Data Breach

September 21, 2022
This GLESEC Warning Follows a Social Media Data Breach
Every day, social media users find that they’ve been hacked or that their information has been a part of a larger data breach. In the latest news of social media security breaches, another social media data breach was recently announced.

Every day, social media users find that they’ve been hacked or that their information has been a part of a larger data breach. In the latest news of social media security breaches, another social media data breach was recently announced.

The cybersecurity experts at GLESEC have seven easy tips social media users can use to better protect themselves. Sergio Heker, founder and CEO of GLESEC, has had his finger on the pulse of online threats since the inception of the internet. Heker understands the growing security challenges people face both personally and professionally.

“Social media users are often so eager to post and share a catchy viral video that they often don’t realize how much of their information they have shared,” Heker explains, “the desire for likes, reposts, replies and views are sometimes clouding users’ better judgment. The consequences are not just personal, but can also get you into hot water with your boss.”

Being “hacked” while on a company phone or computer could compromise and jeopardize users’ employer on a grander scale. In a 2022 survey, 85.3% of organizations have been compromised by at least one cyber attack. Consequences for organizations may include network downtime, client and investor dissatisfaction, productivity loss, opportunity cost, revenue loss, and hard money ransoms edging into the tens of millions of dollars ($4 million+ on average) and taking up to a year to fully clean up.

According to GLESEC, some of the most popular online threats include phishing scams, malware and account takeovers. Heker and his team at GLESEC suggests these top seven tips to keep your social accounts and personal and your employers information more secure:

  •  Keep your device updated: install and update reputable antivirus software, update phone manufacturer suggested patches, as well as all your apps.
  •  Use passwords that are not easily guessed; many passwords keepers help you generate impossible-to-guess passwords.
  •  If using browser-based access, ensure that the URL of the social network says “https” (with an s) with a lock icon next to it.
  •  If using a company device, ensure you are compliant with your company’s cybersecurity policies.
  •  Be alert: social engineering is often employed to cleverly manipulate people into giving up sensitive information.
  •  Slow down. Bad actors count on users quickly clicking on buttons without noticing the “hack” and tell-tale signs of a cyberattack.
  •  Always use two-factor authentication mechanisms to reduce the ability of bad actors to breach your device.

“Setting multi-factor authentication on your social accounts is an easy way to add another layer of protection,” said Heker. “Your phone and/or email address is a good tool for a two-factor authentication, both of which should be used as a backup for one another. Also, if using a company device, don’t uninstall any required security software or ‘side-load’ unauthorized or un-certified applications.”